This is for all the Bob Dylan fans out there: the history of the famous song, “Like a Rolling Stone”, from 50 years ago. Do you feel old now?

Rolling Stone – It was exactly 50 years ago today that Bob Dylan walked into Studio A at Columbia Records in New York and recorded “Like a Rolling Stone,” which we have called the single greatest song of all time. The track was on store shelves just a month later, where it shot to Number Two on the Billboard Hot 100 (held back only by the Beatles’ “Help!”) and influenced an entire new generation of rock stars. “That snare shot sounded like somebody’d kicked open the door to your mind,” Bruce Springsteen said when he inducted Dylan into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1988. “When I was 15 and I heard ‘Like a Rolling Stone,’ I heard a guy who had the guts to take on the whole world and who made me feel like I had to too.”

Just one month before before recording “Like a Rolling Stone,” Dylan was in Europe wrapping up the solo acoustic tour chronicled in D.A. Pennebaker’s documentary Don’t Look Back. The electric “Subterranean Homesick Blues” had been out for three months and was all over the radio, but his concerts were completely unplugged affairs and protest songs like “The Lonesome Death of Hattie Carroll” and “The Times They Are-A Changin'” were still sprinkled into his set list. But somewhere on the tour, he began penning a long, free-form piece of writing he compared to “vomit.” [It was] just a rhythm thing on paper all about my steady hatred,” he said, “directed at some point that was honest.”

Read more: Rolling Stone